Totango Blog: Your Guide to Managing the Customer Journey

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They’ve got it wrong, it’s not “Customer Company”

Salesforce has got it wrong, there’s a reason why most companies are not customer centric yet (not that they don’t know they need to be). Tomorrow, Marc Benioff is streaming a live broadcast from Boston on “How to become a customer company”. I assume much of the content will be a rehash of his speech from a couple weeks ago.

But like I said in last week’s blog, it’s not that companies don’t know being customer focused is important, there’s a reason why it hasn’t happened yet –  there are too many obstacles! It’s making the change that proves difficult.

Last week, I opened at the first ever Customer Success Summit (see below recorded video and presentation) with that exact question in mind: what makes companies customer companies?

But before we dive into the explanation, I’d like to share my two cents on the customer company. Customer centricity isn’t new, so why now and what has changed?

Basically there are 3 main areas of change that organizations need to adapt in order to become customer companies:

  1. People

  2. Methodologies

  3. Technologies

People – a true customer company has a Chief Customer Officer, an executive who is responsible for ensuring the success of every customer’s journey.

Methodologiesmapping customer journeys, applying customer success processes and many more which are developed these days to achieve customer centricity.

Technologies – Being able to expose the full customer context to every person who interacts with customer, no matter if it’s from sales, support, product management or marketing, and the ability to make important changes in the customer lifecycle are essential to the success of this change.

So, for companies to become customer centric they have to be Pro-Customer Companies

Pro-value – customer value driven, motivated, compensated and recognized

Pro-active – drive the organizational change and be pro-active about customer success and

Pro-fessional – professionally implement customer-facing processes, adopt technologies and build the right organizational structure.

Other presentations at the CS Summit discussed the challenges and lessons learned from early adopter companies who are on their way to become Pro-Customer Companies.

Take 2 minutes to catch my story at the beginning (3:23-4:53), I’m sure you can figure out the rest from there.

Customer Success Summit: The Pro-Customer Company from Totango on Vimeo.

Guy Nirpaz

Guy Nirpaz is a Silicon Valley-based Israeli entrepreneur and CEO of Totango, a Customer Success software platform. A pioneer in the Customer Success field, Guy established the Customer Success Summit and is a well-regarded industry speaker and community contributor. Guy loves people and technology and has dedicated his career to improving the way in which business is done through innovation. Fun Facts: Guy moonlights as the lead guitarist in a rock band based out of his garage in Palo Alto and used to command a tank battalion...as well as having grown oranges.

  • Mary Rosberg

    Hi Guy – Thanks again for a great conference last week. RE: Pro-Customer and the 3 pro’s, the thing that makes me go hmmm is in the Pro-active description: DRIVE THE ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE. Ouch. So hard to make this happen quickly and to the nth degree. Would that there were a Matrix-like chip you could just put into everyone, or a koolaid you could spray.

    • Mary, you’re right!

      Pro-Active at the high level is about moving from rest to motion as Atri put it. Making the change.
      Pro-Active on the day-to-day basis is about pro-actively identifying events in the customer lifecycle which require attention and action.

  • Hi Guy – Thanks again for a great conference last week. RE: Pro-Customer and the 3 pro’s, the thing that makes me go hmmm is in the Pro-active description: DRIVE THE ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE. Ouch. So hard to make this happen quickly and to the nth degree. Would that there were a Matrix-like chip you could just put into everyone, or a koolaid you could spray.

    • Mary, you’re right!

      Pro-Active at the high level is about moving from rest to motion as Atri put it. Making the change.
      Pro-Active on the day-to-day basis is about pro-actively identifying events in the customer lifecycle which require attention and action.

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